Evidence

The first evidence of hypertension and its complications was in the early 19th century by William Heberden and Jean-Valentin Marmaduke De Quincey.

In 1874, William Budd coined "arterial hypertension" to describe this condition.

George Pickering and colleagues first presented clinical evidence of cardiac problems from hypertension at the meeting of the American Heart Association in 1955.

Cardiac problems from hypertension can be reversed if detected early on and treated promptly with lifestyle changes, blood pressure medications, and sometimes other drugs like aspirin or beta-blockers to control heart disease risk factors that increase blood pressure levels (Kloner et al., 2001; Kloner et al., 2004).

Hypertension is an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment as well as dementia.

The more you know about the effects of this condition, the better prepared you will be to manage it.